5 UK-based companies taking the AdTech world by storm

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Advertisers today know that while content may be king, data is the real belle of the ball. This is where advertising technology — or AdTech — comes into the equation: A rapidly growing industry in the UK and around the globe, AdTech connects the dots between marketing tactics and data on consumer behaviour and the journey through the sales funnel.

Salesforce’s fourth annual State of Marketing report cites significant growth year over year within the AdTech arena: It predicts 23-25% YoY growth for technologies like marketing analytics and CRM tools, and a whopping 53% YoY increase for artificial intelligence.

A handful of startups are cashing in on the AdTech boom with innovative products that are changing the game for advertisers and marketers. Below are five British businesses whose AdTech products are making serious waves on a global scale.

1. Captify

Search keywords have long been considered one of the most accurate indicators of purchasing intent, but advertisers haven’t always been able to pin down this crucial data accurately. Enter Captify, a startup launched in 2011 whose powerful C3 technology stack enables brands to serve customers with ads at precisely the right time to optimise conversion rates.

Captify calls itself “a global data activation company and a pioneer of search intelligence” that powers consumer insights across all channels and devices. The company’s products help its clients — high-profile brands including the likes of Amazon, Ford, Kellogg, Microsoft, Nintendo, and Nike — dissect the search behaviours of more than 2.2 billion people around the world. Captify works with both advertisers and publishers to extract concrete value out of complex consumer search habits. 

Captify will have a presence at this year’s dmexco conference, taking place September 13-14, 2017 in Cologne, Germany. The company will host a two-day live seminar series in Hall 6, B-058. Stop by to join the conversation about how smart search insights are transforming the marketing stack.

2. 51 Degrees

51 Degrees is a company with a penchant for numbers: Its device detection software can effectively determine which of more than 44,530 devices a customer is using to access a site; it’s currently used by more than 1.5 million global websites; and it supports 2 billion unique device visits every month. Not to mention: The software is 99.9% accurate, and can pick up on a user’s device in less than a single millisecond. Oh, and it’s effective at driving conversions, too: It’s been proven to help retailers boost rates by as much as 33%.

51 Degrees’ open-source APIs make the platform extra customisable for brands who want to know details such as, say, a customer’s exact physical screen size. In addition, the company’s suite of products includes analytics, performance-monitoring tools, and image optimisation software. Currently, the company works with big-name clients like eBay, IBM, and Unilever.

51 Degrees will have a presence at this year’s dmexco conference, taking place September 13-14, 2017 in Cologne, Germany. The company will be located with IAB in Hall 6, C-080. Stop by to join the conversation about the increased importance of device detection in a world of wearables, smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, and virtual home assistants.

3. Wirewax

In an advertiser’s ideal world, the content marketing video they’ve spent six months and tens of thousands of pounds creating would let viewers click on painstakingly crafted product placements and purchase the said products seamlessly — without deviating away from the viewing experience.

Wirewax makes this scenario a reality — though it’s just one of the use cases for the innovative platform, which creates interactive videos that let users engage directly with characters, objects, and products. This functionality presents a huge range of possibilities for advertisers, from in-video contests and immersive websites to shoppable runways and gamified marketing campaigns. Major brands are perking up and paying attention: Wirewax currently lists companies like Disney, GE, Samsung, and Under Armour as clients.

4. voodooh

Whereas many AdTech platforms concentrate on intricate technical and analytical features, UK startup voodooh takes a more creative approach to digital marketing.

The company aims to “demystify” the digital out-of-home (OOH) space. In laymen’s terms, this means that it helps advertisers create compelling campaigns that target consumers outside of their home environments — whether that refers to innovative billboard designs, “smart” vending machines, or experiential marketing activations. voodooh offers a variety of services, including bespoke campaign creation, white label content, and technical consulting. The company has created intelligent digital solutions for an eclectic collection of client campaigns, including Black Swan, Buzz Radar, Concur and Polaroid .

5. LoopMe

LoopMe combines two of the buzziest and most exciting terms in the AdTech world: Video and AI. 

The company’s primary focus is on all things video, from vertically formatted video to 360-degree and rich-media experiences to HTML5 and VPAID pre-roll. The company’s team of creatives even creates bespoke mini-games in video format for its clients, which include companies like Airbnb and Honda. 

But the real kicker (and what makes LoopMe so exciting to marketers) is the company’s handle on artificial intelligence: It uses AI to optimise its efforts, from algorithms that learn and adapt in real-time to better meet campaign goals, to predictive modeling to match supply and demand. 

The company touts itself as a mobile-first expert, and its videos currently reach more than 2 billion devices worldwide. Earlier this year, LoopMe raised a significant round of VC funding to further hone its products and continue expanding its sphere of global influence.

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